[ Reading ] ➾ Elves in Anglo-Saxon England Author Alaric Hall – Bassgrotto.co.uk

Elves in Anglo-Saxon England PDF Epub Elves In Anglo Saxon England Author Alaric Hall Larringtonlifecoaching.co.uk Helps Illuminate Anglo Saxon Social Attitudes Towards The Supernatural, Health And Gender, And Shows How Texts Can Be As Important In The Shaping Of Social Realities As They Are In Recording Them HISTORICAL JOURNAL Anglo Saxon Elves Old English Aelfe Are The Best Attested Non Christian Beliefs In Early Medieval Europe, But Current Interpretations Of The Evidence Derive Directly From Outdated Nineteenth And Early Twentieth Century Scholarship Integrating Linguistic And Textual Approaches Into An Anthropologically Inspired Framework, This Book Reassesses The Full Range Of Evidence It Traces Continuities And Changes In Medieval Non Christian Beliefs With A New Degree Of Reliability, From Pre Conversion Times To The Eleventh Century And Beyond, And Uses Comparative Material From Medieval Ireland And Scandinavia To Argue For A Dynamic Relationship Between Beliefs And Society In Particular, It Interprets The Cultural Significance Of Elves As A Cause Of Illness In Medical Texts, And Provides New Insights Into The Much Discussed Scandinavian Magic Of Seidr Elf Beliefs, Over, Were Connected With Anglo Saxon Constructions Of Sex And Gender Their Changing Nature Provides A Rare Insight Into A Fascinating Area Of Early Medieval European Culture Shortlisted For The Katharine Briggs Folklore Award 2007 ALARIC HALL Is Lecturer In Medieval English Literature At The University Of Leeds.


10 thoughts on “Elves in Anglo-Saxon England

  1. says:

    Review by Michael D.C Drout for The Medieval ReviewDespite its seemingly hyper specialized title, Alaric Hall s Elves in Anglo Saxon England is a book that should be read by all medievalists Hall s conclusions about his subject are significant, but farimportant is his methodological approach, which is a new model for early medieval scholarship His demonstration of the ways that rock solid philology can be combined with cross cultural historical scholarship, folkloristic analysis of late Review by Michael D.C Drout for The Medieval ReviewDespite its seemingly hyper specialized ti...


  2. says:

    Here comes a scholarly look at the concept of elves in England as believed by the Anglo Saxons who conquered the islands In my reading of the book I found it to be very scholarly, dry and textbook like Bit hard to enjoy and focus on but none the less informative.The concept of Alf, Alp or alb comes up a lot in English lore Usually it is thought to mean Elf but what is an elf , especially in Anglo Saxon lore The author here uses old lore from the norse and scandinavia to help give the reade Here comes a scholarly look at the concept of elves in England as believed by the Anglo Saxons who conquered the islands In my reading of the book I found it to be very scholarly, dry and textbook like Bit hard to enjoy and focus on but none the less informative.The concept of Alf, Alp or alb comes up a lot in English lore Usually it is thought to mean Elf but what is an elf , especially in Anglo Saxon lore The author here uses old lore from the norse and scandinavia to help give the reader a picture of what elves were The author also relies strongly on linguistics and word variation to give us a definition While that in itself can be enlightening it can also make for very difficult reading especially if you are not a linguist.For starters going into old Scandinavian folklore we learn from...


  3. says:

    Wow This was one of the hardest books I have ever had to read, but was well worth it I feel like I should have had a companion book to help with some of the language used in the book, as I am not a scholar of Anglo Saxon language But, despite my lack of in depth knowledge of that subject matter, Hall clearly states his case for elves with countless references, in depth research and a full linguistic analysis of the word I am actually surprised this is not arecommended book for serious Wow This was one of the hardest books I have ever had to read, but was well worth it I feel like I should have had a companion book to help with some of the language used in the book, as I am not a scholar of Anglo Saxon language But, despite my lack of in depth knowledge of that subject matter, Hall clearly states his case for elves with countless references, in depth research and a full linguistic analysis of the word I am actually surprised this is not arecommended book for serious heathen study as it really went all out in showing the flaws in associating the word elf with one particular class of beings ...


  4. says:

    Alaric Hall, a lecturer in Medieval English Literature at the University of Leeds, delves into the sources that mention or reference elves, or lfe, looking not just at texts and writings from Britain, but also Scandinavia and mainland Europe to find similarities and linkages in these references Hall breaks it down to the language level, exploring spellings, uses, as well as inferring meanings for elves, which at times c...


  5. says:

    Alaric Hall s Elves in Anglo Saxon England is a scholarly work and like most academic texts is a bit dry and makes for slow reading However, despite that there are things to learn for the serious student of faerie lore, Anglo Saxon culture or linguistics For our own part we had to stop frequently to look up technical terms associated with the study of linguistics but that, in itself, was rather enlightening One of the many things we learned from this book was that Elvis was an old Scottish wo Alaric Hall s Elves in Anglo Saxon England is a scholarly work and like most academic texts is a bit dry and makes for slow reading However, despite that there are things to learn for the serious student of faerie lore, Anglo Saxon culture or linguistics For our own part we had to stop frequently ...


  6. says:

    I really enjoyed the information provided in this book, but it is very dense and very scholarly I can t really fault it for being so it is what it was meant to be and it was successful in being so It was just kind of a difficult read for someone who s not us...


  7. says:

    This is the second time I ve read through this book, and while the philological jargon can be pretty dense at times, Hall s thorough analysis of the conceptual place elves had in Anglo Saxon lore is mostly spot on.


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