[ Reading ] ➸ Confederates in the Attic Author Tony Horwitz – Bassgrotto.co.uk

Confederates in the Attic When Prize Winning War Correspondent Tony Horwitz Leaves The Battlefields Of Bosnia And The Middle East For A Peaceful Corner Of The Blue Ridge Mountains, He Thinks He S Put War Zones Behind Him But Awakened One Morning By The Crackle Of Musket Fire, Horwitz Starts Filing Front Line Dispatches Again This Time From A War Close To Home, And To His Own Heart.Propelled By His Boyhood Passion For The Civil War, Horwitz Embarks On A Search For Places And People Still Held In Thrall By America S Greatest Conflict The Result Is An Adventure Into The Soul Of The Unvanquished South, Where The Ghosts Of The Lost Cause Are Resurrected Through Ritual And Remembrance.In Virginia, Horwitz Joins A Band Of Hardcore Reenactors Who Crash Diet To Achieve The Hollow Eyed Look Of Starved Confederates In Kentucky, He Witnesses Klan Rallies And Calls For Race War Sparked By The Killing Of A White Man Who Brandishes A Rebel Flag At Andersonville, He Finds That The Prison S Commander, Executed As A War Criminal, Is Now Exalted As A Martyr And Hero And In The Book S Climax, Horwitz Takes A Marathon Trek From Antietam To Gettysburg To Appomattox In The Company Of Robert Lee Hodge, An Eccentric Pilgrim Who Dubs Their Odyssey The Civil Wargasm Written With Horwitz S Signature Blend Of Humor, History, And Hard Nosed Journalism, Confederates In The Attic Brings Alive Old Battlefields And New Ones Classrooms, Courts, Country Bars Where The Past And The Present Collide, Often In Explosive Ways Poignant And Picaresque, Haunting And Hilarious, It Speaks To Anyone Who Has Ever Felt Drawn To The Mythic South And To The Dark Romance Of The Civil War.


10 thoughts on “Confederates in the Attic

  1. says:

    OK, so I m on a Civil War road trip with my Significant Other, following the official Virginia state Lee s Retreat tour and reading to him from Confederates in the Attic to pass the time The section we were reading dealt with the bigger than life owner of an old general store that he had turned into a museum of sorts I said this is really over the top Horowitz maybe exaggerated this guy to make a better story S.O said we should try to find the place and just then, we pass an ol OK, so I m on a Civil War road trip with my Significant Other, following the official Virginia state Lee s Retreat tour and reading to him from Confederates in the Attic to pass the time The section we were reading dealt with the bigger than life owner of an old general store that he had turned into a museum of sorts I said this is really over the top Horowitz maybe exaggerated this guy to make a better story S.O said we should tr...


  2. says:

    When I was in first or second grade, I started creating books about American history World War II, the Indian Wars and, of course, the Civil War These books had no texts, only pictures extremely graphic pictures that, today, would probably get me invited to the psychiatrist s office They were constructed in a bit of genius, I might add out of large, rectangular pads of Norwest Bank forms, supplied by my dad I would take the pad and turn it upside down, using the cardboard back as a cover When I was in first or second grade, I started creating books about American history World War II, the Indian Wars and, of course, the Civil War These books had no texts, only pictures extremely graphic pictures that, today, would probably get me invited to the psychiatrist s office They were constructed in a bit of genius, I might add out of large, rectangular pads of Norwest Bank forms, supplied by my dad I would take the pad and turn it upside down, using the cardboard back as a cover, and the blank sides of the forms a...


  3. says:

    In Confederates in the Attic, journalist Tony Horwitz explores the ways in which the Civil War is still present in Southern culture.I was a Civil War re enactor in junior high and high school, and I particularly appreciated his chapter on that very strange hobby A Farb of the Heart Farb, by the way, is re enactor slang for all things inauthentic I ve not always been impressed with Horwitz s books I thought Baghdad without a Map to be particularly slight , but here he really nails it For In Confederates in the Attic, journalist Tony Horwitz explores the ways in which the Civil War is still present in Southern culture.I was a Civil War re enactor in junior high and high school, and I particularly appreciated his chapter on that very strange hobby A Farb of the Heart Farb, by the way, is re enactor slang for all things inauthentic I ve not always been impressed with Horwitz s books I thought Baghdad without a Map to be particularly slight , but here he really nails it For instance, he ...


  4. says:

    An excellent expos on the continuing history of the Civil War and the attitudes that persist More importantly it rightly links the use of the rebel flag with the modern civil rights movement and discounts its Civil War usage Horwitz also exposes the racist attitudes hidden within societies such as the Sons of Confederate Veterans who try to market themselves as legitimate and historical groups For those who have not experienced first hand the radical attitudes of these groups such as the An excellent expos on the continuing history of the Civil War and the at...


  5. says:

    Tony Horwitz s grandfather was an immigrant like many before him he left his country and went to look for a new life in America Although he could neither speak nor read English when he arrived from Russia, Horwitz the elder nonetheless purchased a book a tome on the Civil War, which he continued to pore over until his death at 102 When young Tony was growing up, his father read him stories about the war instead of fairytales, which inspired him to paint a mural of the war in the attic of t Tony Hor...


  6. says:

    I had to get this one back to the library, so I m going on memory a bit Generally, I really like this book, though I m still mystified over the reenactment craze And I m saying this as a Virginian who grew up with the Civil War, could rattle off casualty figures for various battles both North and South , called people north of the Potomac, Yankees, and who even went to a Robert E Lee High School of which there must be dozens throughout the South At some point, I just didn t care that mu I had to get this one back to the library, so I m going on memory a bit Generally, I really like this book, though I m still mystified over the reenactment craze And I m saying this as a Virginian who grew up with the Civil War, could rattle off casualty figures for various battles both North and South , called people north of the Potomac, Yankees, and who even went to a Robert E Lee High School of which there must be dozens throughout the South At some point, I just didn t care that much about it any, but then along came Ken Burns impressive series on the war, which though Horwitz doesn t say so, at least not directly , seemed to coincide with various political wars of the then present Since I m reading this book several years after its writing...


  7. says:

    A good read, if one believes or wants to believe that Southern boogeymen, dressed in woolen uniforms, their archaic muskets gleaming in the sun, are waiting to launch a second War for Southern Independence against the sacred Union O.K., maybe that s a bit extreme But I think Horowitz treats the South the way travel writer Horace Kephart once treated Southern Appalachian...


  8. says:

    Since I ve spent most of my life in the South, and since I m a fan of Gone with the Wind, I almost always find myself rooting for the Confederates This is, of course, fully 150 years after the war, which I did not have to live through, and after the Emancipation Proclamation, which I also did not have to wrestle with It s difficult to analyze my ancestors ideals with my 21st century criteria.This is the problem Horwitz runs into as well how do you reconcile the good old days with the horro Since I ve spent most of my life in the South, and since I m a fan of Gone with the Wind, I almost always find myself rooting for the Confederates This is, of course, fully 150 years after the war, which I did not have to live through, and after the Emancipation Proclamation, which I also did not have to wrestle with It s difficult to analyze my ancestors ideals with my 21st century criteria.This is the problem Horwitz runs into as well how do you reconcile the good old days with the horrors of slavery Do people who revere the Confederacy also wish that all of the Old South s institutions were still in place Why do so many people, after so many years, still idolize the losers of our country s bloodiest war For a Southerner, speaking of the Civil War often involves careful, deliberate articulation of ideas, a thoughtfully w...


  9. says:

    I stumbled across this book by accident It s fascinating, if often depressing I ve always maintained that if reenactors were really serious about authenticity, they d issue live ammunition Nevertheless, Horwitz, whose immigrant great grandfather became obsessed with Civil War history, also caught the bug, and when they discovered a TV crew shooting a scene in the land next to their house in Maryland, decided to investigate what makes Confederate reenactors they hate to be called that preferr I stumbled across this book by accident It s fascinating, if often depressing I ve always maintained that if reenactors were really serious about authenticity, they d issue live ammunition Nevertheless, Horwitz, whose immigrant great grandfather became obsessed with Civil War history, also caught the bug, and when they discovered a TV crew shooting a scene in the land next to their house in Maryland, ...


  10. says:

    This is sort of a travelogue in which the author visits lots of Civil War sites, participates in reenactments, talks to groups that memorialize the confederate cause, pokes through museums, and so on Having read this at the same time as The Known World, there were points in the book where the juxtaposition of an intimate story of the horrors of slavery and a nonfiction book about a few people who downplay slavery s importance or even romanticize it was too awful to contemplate Sometimes, when This is sort of a travelogue in which the author visits lots of Civil War sites, participates in reenactments, talks to groups that memorialize the confederate cause, pokes through museums, and so on Having read this at the same time as The Known World, there were points in the book where the juxtaposition of an intimate story of the horrors of slavery and a nonfiction book about a few people who downplay slavery s importance or even romanticize it was too awful to contemplate Sometimes, when the Lost Cause advocates and rebel flag proponents are talking about having pride in their ancestry, you can kind of see how that feeling would be meaningful to an often economically distressed people But when the discussion of slavery is weirdly absent from their remembrance of the war or is dismissed as not that important, it becomes hard to breathe How can the institutio...