[[ PDF / Epub ]] ☂ The Pianist Author Władysław Szpilman – Bassgrotto.co.uk

The Pianist The Last Live Broadcast On Polish Radio, On September 23, 1939, Was Chopin S Nocturne In C Minor, Played By A Young Pianist Named Wladyslaw Szpilman, Until His Playing Was Interrupted By German Shelling It Was The Same Piece And The Same Pianist, When Broadcasting Resumed Six Years Later The Pianist Is Szpilman S Account Of The Years Inbetween, Of The Death And Cruelty Inflicted On The Jews Of Warsaw And On Warsaw Itself, Related With A Dispassionate Restraint Borne Of Shock Szpilman, Now 88, Has Not Looked At His Description Since He Wrote It In 1946 The Same Time As Primo Levi S If This Is A Manit Is Too Personally Painful The Rest Of Us Have No Such ExcuseSzpilman S Family Were Deported To Treblinka, Where They Were Exterminated He Survived Only Because A Music Loving Policeman Recognised Him This Was Only The First In A Series Of Fatefully Lucky Escapes That Littered His Life As He Hid Among The Rubble And Corpses Of The Warsaw Ghetto, Growing Thinner And Hungrier, Yet Condemned To Live Ironically It Was A German Officer, Wilm Hosenfeld, Who Saved Szpilman S Life By Bringing Food And An Eiderdown To The Derelict Ruin Where He Discovered Him Hosenfeld Died Seven Years Later In A Stalingrad Labour Camp, But Portions Of His Diary, Reprinted Here, Tell Of His Outraged Incomprehension Of The Madness And Evil He Witnessed, Thereby Establishing An Effective Counterpoint To Ground The Nightmarish Vision Of The Pianist In A Desperate Reality Szpilman Originally Published His Account In Poland In 1946, But It Was Almost Immediately Withdrawn By Stalin S Polish Minions As It Unashamedly Described Collaborations By Lithuanians, Ukrainians, Poles And Jews With The Nazis In 1997 It Was Published In Germany After Szpilman S Son Found It On His Father S Bookcase This Admirably Robust Translation By Anthea Bell Is The First In The English Language There Were 3,500,000 Jews In Poland Before The Nazi Occupation After It There Were 240,000 Wladyslaw Szpilman S Extraordinary Account Of His Own Miraculous Survival Offers A Voice Across The Years For The Faceless Millions Who Lost Their Lives David Vincent


10 thoughts on “The Pianist

  1. says:

    The triumph of the human spirit, the strength of the human soul to find its way out of the darkness, the injustice, the never ending nightmare, the ordeal of living in a world where absolute fear and beastly behaviour dictate everyone s life This is the life of a man, an artist, who experienced persecution, confinement, famine, disease A man whose strength and faith defeated monsters A pianist whose talent touched the heart of the enemy, except this enemy was different from the others, a kind The triumph of the human spirit, the strength of the human soul to find its way out of the darkness, the injustice, the never ending nightmare, the ordeal of living in a world where absolute fear and beastly be...


  2. says:

    This is the first time I am reviewing a book that I have tried and failed to rate.How do I decide on a rating anyway Should I judge the prose the content the author s style of presentation his narrative voice the quality of the translation Do I even have the right to Awarding a star rating to this man s unbelievably harrowing and miraculous tale of surviving a war which c...


  3. says:

    I loved The Pianist for a number of reasons but the supreme reason goes to W adys aw Szpilman s storytelling Szpilman writes down the struggles which he endured in order to survive in Warsaw under the occupation of the Nazis W adys aw voice never grows bitter, neither do his emotions twist to constant abhorrence and it s why, I find myself respecting him so admirably His story was in no means told to invoke hatred or disgust towards Germans His intention was not to spit out political stateme I loved The Pianist for a number of reasons but the supreme reason goes to W adys aw Szpilman s storytelling Szpilman writes down the struggles which he endured in order to survive in Warsaw under the occupation of the Nazis W adys aw voice never grows bitter, neither do his emotions twist to constant abhorrence and it s why, I find myself respecting him so admirably His story was in no means told to invoke hatred or disgust towards Germans His intention was not to spit ...


  4. says:

    There is no way for me to rate or review this book that would do it justice Read it Read it now.


  5. says:

    As always these books are so incredibly hard to read, not just to read but to understand how these cruelties could have ever happened This book was different in that it was not only written by someone in Poland who survived the Holocaust, but someone who probably only survived because of the help of a German officer Excerpts from this offi...


  6. says:

    The Pianist by Written immediately after the war by survivor Wladyslaw Szpilman This book was suppressed for decades The Pianist is a stunning testament to human endurance and tells the story of the horrendous events that took place in Nazi occupied Warsaw and the Jewish ghetto.This is quite a short book but it certainly packs a punch You can almost feel the urgency of the writer to get his story down on paper and yet the story is told in such a way that you feel a confidence and a clarity th The Pianist by Written immediately after the war by survivor Wladyslaw Szpilman This book was suppressed for decades The Pianist is a stunning testament to human endurance and tells the story of the horrendous events that took place in Nazi occupied Warsaw and the Jewish ghetto.This is quite a short book but it certainly packs a punch You can almost feel the urgency of the writer to get his story down on paper and yet the story is told in such a way that you feel a confidence and a clarity that almost makes you feel connected This is a story of one man s survival in a city devastated by war and how his will to survive keeps him alive.This first hand account of the Jewish pianist, Wladyslaw Szpilman, gave me a fantastic and important detailed insight regarding Warsaw, its people and the events leading up to the Warsaw Rising of 1944 I have read quite a few ...


  7. says:

    Smierc miasta The Pianist The Extraordinary Story of One Man s Survival in Warsaw, 1939 45, W adys aw SzpilmanThe Pianist is a memoir by the Polish Jewish pianist and composer W adys aw Szpilman in which he describes his life in Warsaw in occupied Poland during World War II After being forced with his family to live in the Warsaw ghetto, Szpilman manage...


  8. says:

    I ve read a lot about World War II, but I d never fully grasped the complete destruction, the utter devastation of the city of Warsaw Hitler was like a bratty child with a toy he d rather destroy than share with anyone else When he knew he was going to lose the war, he ordered that Warsaw be reduced to rubble Among the ruins there was a Jewish musician named Wladyslaw Szpilman who had managed to survive for six years, and a German named Wilm Hosenfeld who saved Szpilman s life one last time I ve read a lot about World War II, but I d never fully grasped the complete destruction, the utter devastation of the city of Warsaw Hitler was like a bratty child with a toy he d rather destroy than share with anyone else When he knew he was going to lose the war, he ordered that Warsaw be reduced to rubble Among the ruins there was a Jewish musician named Wladyslaw Szpilman who had managed to survive for six years, and a German named Wilm Hosenfeld who saved Szpilman s life one last time I read this entire book in 24 hours Szpilman wrote his account immediately after the war ended, so you can sometimes fe...


  9. says:

    Monument of the Umschlagplatz in Warsaw today.I don t know how to write a review for such a horrifying account of what Wladyslaw Szpilman experienced as a Jew in Warsaw during the Holocaust His writing is very dispassionate and precise, yet he really brought forth the horrors of the war and his daily life struggles with losing his family, hunger, stress, uncertainty and fear at that time I was also very much inspired by how strong his instincts were in certain situations It s incredible how d Monument of the Umschlagplatz in Warsaw today.I don t know how to write a review for such a horrifying account of what Wladyslaw Szpilman experienced as a Jew in Warsaw during the Holocaust His writing is very dispassionate and precise, yet he really brought forth the horrors of the war and his daily life struggles with losing his family, hunger, stress, uncertainty and fear at that time I was also very much inspired by how strong his instincts were in certain situations It s incredible how during times of stress, our body can communicate with us so strongly in favor of surv...


  10. says:

    I became interested in reading The Pianist after seeing the excellent movie, directed by Roman Polanski, that was based on the book After thoroughly enjoying the movie, I had very high hopes for this tome, and I was not disappointed This book is a stunner, bringing to life the horrific conditions and brutality that Wladyslaw Szpilman endured to survive six years of Nazi brutality in Warsaw, Poland.What s truly amazing about this book is how Szpilman tells the story with a sense of detachment I became interested in reading The Pianist after seeing the excellent movie, directed by Roman Polanski, that was based on the book After thoroughly enjoying the movie, I had very high hopes for this tome, and I was not disappointed This book is a stunner, bringing to life the horrific conditions and brutality that Wladyslaw Szpilman endured to survive six years of Nazi brutality in Warsaw, Poland.What s truly amazing about this book is how Szpilman tells the story with a sense of detachment the barbaric killing that he sees up close his final moments with his family, when he realizes shortly after they are gone that will never see them again his b...